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General Questions
Basic Knowledge Questions
Basic Experience Questions
Adding a category or sub category to your Part 66 Licence Questions
Type Rating Questions
Submitting your Application Questions
Application Checklists

General Questions

Q: What do I do if my Part 66 Licence has expired?
A: It is important that you are mindful of the expiry date of your licence and that you do not use your certification privileges if it has expired. However, in the event that your licence has expired, you can apply for a renewal in the normal way but you must also include a letter stating that you have not exercised the privileges of the licence since its expiry date.

Q: What are the differences between, Basic Experience, Practical Training and On the Job Training?
A: The following are the main characteristics of each:

1. Basic Experience:
This is experience that you must obtain in order for you to apply for a Part 66 Basic Licence. It can range from 6 months to 5 years in duration depending on the licence category being sought, previous training and previous licence categories held.

2. Practical Training:
This is training that will be required in order for you to obtain a type rating. A certificate will be issued by a part 147 training organisation on the completion of practical training. It must take a minimum of 2 weeks to complete and normally runs for no longer than 3 weeks.

3. On the Job Training (OJT):
This is experience that will be required in order for you to obtain your first type rating in a particular category. It must be approved by the authority and carried out in a Part 145 maintenance organisation and can take up to a maximum of 3 years to complete. Therefore, your first type rating will require Part 147 Theory training, Part 147 practical training and Part 145 OJT.

Note: For those people working on aircraft with an MTOM of less than 5700KG please contact the Personal licensing office. 


Q: Is it possible to transfer my Part 66 Licence from another EASA licensing authority to the Irish Aviation Authority?
A: Yes. You should first contact your current licensing authority and then submit an application with your Licence to the I.A.A. in the normal way.

Basic Knowledge Questions

Q: What knowledge certificates do I need in order to obtain an EASA Part 66 Licence ?
A: You are required to submit the relevant EASA Module Certificates relevant to the licence category or sub category being sought as detailed in Section 2 of Appendix 1 to Annex 3 of EU 1321/2014 . Refer to PLAM 02-02 for a list of required modules.

Q: How long are Basic knowledge certificates valid for:
A: Normally 10 years. However, it may be possible to extend for an additional 10 years if the syllabus has not changed. Contact the Licensing Department here for further information.

Q: How do I know if my certificates are in an acceptable format:
A: Certificates of Recognition issued after the 1st of August 2012 must be in the format specified in EU1149/2012 and subsequently in EU1321/2014. In certain circumstances, Part 147 Certificates of Recognition may have been issued in a previously acceptable format, i.e. they do not match the EASA Form 148/149 format specified in EU1149/2012. The format should match the following examples from the regulation:

EASA Form 148 Basic Training Certificate
EASA Form 149 Type Training Certificate

If it does not match the format examples , you should contact the issuing Part 147 organisation and request a replacement.

Basic Experience Questions

Q: What basic experience do I need before applying for an EASA Part 66 Licence?
A: An applicant must provide evidence that he/she meets the practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft requirements of Part-66.A.30 appropriate to the Part-66.A.20 category applied for.

For a Category A, subcategories B1.2 and B1.4 and category B3
• 3 years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft, if the applicant has no previous relevant technical training or
• 2 years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft and completion of training considered relevant by the competent authority as a skilled worker or
 • 1 year of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft and completion of a basic training course approved iaw Part 147

For a Category B2 and subcategories B1.1 and B1.3
• 5 years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft, if the applicant has no previous relevant technical training or
• 3 years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft and completion of training considered relevant by the competent authority as a skilled worker or
• 2 years of practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft and completion of a basic training course approved iaw Part 147    

Note: A skilled worker is someone who has completed an Irish Aircraft Mechanic Apprenticeship or other training deemed to be equivalent by the authority.

For a Category C with respect to large aircraft
• 3 years of experience exercising category B1.1, B1.3 or B2 privileges on large aircraft or as support staff according to point 145.A.35 or a combination of both, or
• 5 years of experience exercising category B1.2, B1.4 privileges on large aircraft or as support staff according to point 145.A.35 or a combination of both

For a Category C with respect to other than large aircraft
• 3 years of experience exercising category B1 or B2 privileges on other than large aircraft or as support staff according to point 145.A.35 or a combination of both

For a Category C obtained through the academic route
• An academic degree in a technical discipline, from a university or other higher educational institution recognised by the competent authority
• 3 years of experience working in a civil aircraft maintenance environment on a representative  selection of tasks directly associated with aircraft maintenance including 6 months observation of base maintenance tasks

Refer to PLAM 02-02 for more detailed information.

Q: Can I submit basic experience that has been gained in a non-EASA Part 145 approved maintenance Organisation?
A: Yes. However, only experience gained in organisations that are EASA Part 145, EASA Part M subpart (f), FAR-145, Transport Canada approved org and Australian Part 145 approved will be accepted. Experience gained under the supervision of an independent certifying staff (this should be an EASA Part 66 Licence holder type rated on the aircraft being worked on, and pre-accepted by the Authority in advance) may also be accepted.

Q: What is the meaning of “skilled worker”?
A: A skilled worker is a person who has completed training considered relevant by the competent authority. The only training considered relevant by the Irish Aviation Authority is the approved Irish Aircraft Mechanic apprenticeship. Other training considered acceptable by other EU member states for the purpose of skilled worker may be considered acceptable.

Q: How much recent maintenance experience do I need for my Basic Category Application?
A: At least 6 months of your experience must have been gained in the 12 months prior to your application for a licence. At least a further 6 months must have been gained within the 7 years prior to application. The remainder of your required experience can have been gained in the 10 years prior to application. If applying for an additional category or sub category, the experience requirements as outlined in appendix 4 to Annex 3 of EU 1321/2014 can include 3 months of recent maintenance experience.

Q: Do I need to have my experience verified by signature, stamp or both?
A: The I.A.A. requires on each task, a certifying staff signature along with one of the following:
•Their authorisation stamp or
•Their authorisation number or
•Their Aircraft Maintenance Licence number.

Adding a category or sub category to your Part 66 Licence Questions

Q: What are the Part 66 categories and sub categories?
A: Category A certifying mechanics will be qualified to issue certificates of release to service following minor scheduled line maintenance and simple defect rectification, as specified in Part-145, within the limits of tasks specifically endorsed on his/her Part-145 authorisation.
Category B line maintenance certifying technicians will be qualified, as either Mechanical (B1) or Avionics (B2), to carry out unscheduled defect rectification and scheduled maintenance checks within the coverage of his/her licence in accordance with Part M and Part-145 authorisation. Base maintenance technicians qualified to B1 or B2 level will be required in base maintenance to support the category C certifying staff. Category B3 is applicable to piston-engine non-pressurised aeroplanes of 2000kg MTOM and below.
Category C base maintenance certifying engineers will be qualified to release an aircraft to service after base maintenance when the category B1 and B2 qualified base maintenance support have signed for mechanical and avionics systems.

The A and B1 Mechanical licence has 4 sub-categories;
   A1 & B1.1 Turbine engined aeroplanes
   A2 & B1.2 Piston engined aeroplanes
   A3 & B1.3 Turbine engined helicopters
   A4 & B1.4 Piston engined helicopters

For each sub-category the licence coverage includes airframe, engine and electrical systems. There is also some provision for the certification of work on avionics systems.
The B2 avionics licence has no subcategories and covers both fixed wing aeroplanes and helicopters.

Q: What do I need to add a Category C to my Part 66 Licence?
A: You must have at least 3 years working in a Category B1 or B2 support role or as a line maintenance certifying engineer of which at least 12 months in a base maintenance certifying role.
Proof of experience certifying in a base maintenance environment shall be demonstrated by submitting a Part 145 Personal Authorisation Certificate or other supporting documentation.

For a Category C obtained through the academic route:
a. An academic degree in a technical discipline, from a university or other higher educational institution recognised by the competent authority
b. 3 years of experience working in a civil aircraft maintenance environment on a representative selection of tasks directly associated with aircraft maintenance including 6 months observation of base maintenance tasks.

See PLAM 02-02 for further information.

Q: How much experience do I need to add a new category to my Part 66 Licence?
A: Refer to Appendix 4 of Annex 3 to EU 1321/2014 below: Refer to PLAM 02-02

Experience requirements for extending a Part-66 aircraft maintenance licence
The table below shows the experience requirements for adding a new category or subcategory to an existing Part-66 licence.
The experience shall be practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft in the subcategory relevant to the application.
The experience requirement will be reduced by 50 % if the applicant has completed an approved Part-147 course relevant to the subcategory.


Type Rating Questions

Q: How long are Type Rating Certificates of Recognition valid for?
A: Three years from the date of commencement of the training.

Q: What do I need in order to add a type rating to my Part 66 Licence?
A:
1. A completed Form 19.
2. An identity document.
3. A Theory Certificate of Recognition
4. A Practical Certificate of Recognition
5. An approved OJT log book only if it is your first Type Rating in a particular Licence category.

Q: When do I need to submit an On the Job Training Log Book?
A: Only when you apply for your first type rating in a particular licence category. The OJT log book must be approved by the licensing authority. A draft copy of the OJT book should be submitted to the authority prior to application if not approved. It must be completed in an EASA part 145 organisation. A copy of the Part 145 organisations MOE 3.15 procedure must be included with the OJT Log Book when submitting to the authority for approval. Some Part 145 organisations will have a pre-approved OJT Log Book already prepared which meets the requirements of the regulation.

See Section 6 of Appendix 3 to EU 1321/2014 and the associated AMC for further details.

Submitting your Application Question

Q: What documents do I need to submit with my application for an EASA Part 66 Basic Licence?
A: Please refer to Page 6 of the EASA Form 19 and the Application checklists page of this website.

1. A completed Form 19
2. An Identity Document (preferably a good quality passport copy)
3. Relevant certificates (Original certificates should be submitted.)
4. Proof of Maintenance experience where relevant
5. Completed Interactive Basic Experience Matrix Form
6. OJT Log Book if applying for your first type rating

Note: If Original certificates cannot be submitted, certified true copies can be submitted. These must be certified as true copies by a Quality Manager or other EASA Form 4 holder. A copy of the EASA Form 4 for the person who has certified your documents as true must be included with your application. Failure to submit a copy of the Form 4 with your application will result in your application being delayed.

Q: How do I know that I meet the basic experience requirements?
A: You complete the Interactive Basic Experience Matrix Form (RPPL.F.057) thereby confirming on a weekly basis that you met the basic experience requirements. Click here to download and print this form. You should submit this form with your application which will speed up the assessment process.

Q: What is an identity document?
A: You should submit valid photographic ID in the form of a copy of your passport.
In all cases the Authority must be able to determine your date of birth and place of birth.


Application checklist

Initial Issue

EASA Form 19 (this form) properly completed and signed.

Copy of Passport or other national identity document.

All relevant Part-66 modular certificates for the required category(s). See Note 1.

All relevant Part-66 modular certificates for the required category(s). See Note 1.All relevant Part-66 modular certificates for the required category(s). See Note 1.All relevant Part-66 modular certificates for the required category(s). See Note 1.

Completed Interactive Basic Experience Matrix Form

Type ratings will not be added at initial issue. A separate application must be made – see amendment details

Completed payment form.



Initial Issue

(Conversion of National AMEL)

EASA Form 19 (this form) properly completed and signed.

Copy of Passport or other national identity document

National Licence (Original, not a Copy)

Details and evidence of BAEC examinations passed.

Completed payment form.


Amendment

Additional Category / Sub-Category

EASA Form 19 (this form) properly completed and signed.

Copy of Passport or other national identity document

Part-66 AML (Original, not a Copy)

All relevant Part-66 modular certificates for the required category(s). See Note 1.

Evidence of the required experience. See Note 2.

Completed payment form.



Amendment

Additional Type Rating

EASA Form 19 (this form) properly completed and signed.

Copy of Passport or other national identity document

Part-66 AML (Original, not a Copy)

Type training certificate(s) which must cover theoretical training and practical training and assessment. See Note 1 & 3.

Evidence of 6 months experience in the relevant category, if a reduction in duration of practical training and assessment is requested. See Note 2.

Completed payment form.

Amendment

Removal of a limitation

EASA Form 19 (this form) properly completed and signed.

Copy of Passport or other national identity document

Part-66 AML (Original, not a Copy)

Training certificated as required

Completed payment form.


Replacement
 

Copy of Garda Report, signed, stamped and dated.

EASA Form 19 (this form) properly completed and signed.

Copy of Passport or other national identity document

Copy of Licence if available

Completed payment form.



Renewal

EASA Form 19 (this form) properly completed and signed.

Copy of Passport or other national identity document

Part-66 AML (Original, not a Copy)

Completed payment form.

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